The national survey, which was commissioned by the Career College Association (CCA), indicates that nearly 94 percent of American adults believe people would be at least somewhat likely to consider pursuing green-related education if the federal government were to provide a financial incentive. However, only 1 percent have already obtained or are obtaining education for green jobs.

The survey found that while more than 70 percent of American adults are familiar with the idea of green jobs, a much smaller percentage have seized on the numerous opportunities presented in the field today.

Knowledge about green job opportunities and training is much higher among those with greater education. College graduates are almost twice as likely as those with only a high school degree or less to know about the growing availability of green jobs (41 percent versus 22 percent), meaning that those who might benefit the most from green jobs access and training are likely to know the least about it.

“Public understanding of green jobs does not match up with the opportunities, and workers who might form the green jobs work force of the future lack awareness of the practical steps they can take to prepare today,” said CCA President Harris N. Miller. “Green jobs can be the wave of the future, but for our country to achieve that goal, we must educate the workforce about green job prospects and the training needed to break into this field.”

The majority of Americans see the benefits associated with green jobs, despite only 2 percent having or having had a green job: Seventy-two percent strongly or somewhat agree that the expansion of green jobs will help preserve a high quality environment, and 63 percent strongly or somewhat agree that more green jobs would have a positive outcome for energy costs.

This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of CCA among 2,099 adults ages 18 and older.