Stefanie Valentic

Stefanie
Valentic
Associate Editor,
EHS Today

Stefanie Valentic is an associate editor for EHS Today magazine, a Penton Media Inc. publication.

 A native of Cleveland, Ohio, she has been in B2B publishing for eight years. Her work has spanned many industries including crop protection, landscaping, horticulture and pest control.

She holds a Bachelor of Science in Journalism degree from Ohio University. You can find her on Twitter @SVSafety.

Articles
NSC: 7 Driving Safety Tips for Memorial Day Weekend [Photo Gallery]

An estimated 409 people may be killed and 47,000 seriously injured in motor vehicle accidents during Memorial Day weekend this year, according to the National Safety Council.

The number of fatalities is expected to be 12 percent higher than the average number of deaths, 364, that occurred in the past six years. The three-day holiday period begins at 6 p.m. ET Friday, May 26 and ends at 11:59 p.m. ET Monday, May 29.

Regulation to Expand Safety at California Oil Refineries

A new regulation in California aims to improve workplace safety and health at oil refineries across the state.

The state’s Department of Industrial Relations’ (DIR) Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board approved the rule, which provides a standardized framework for anticipating, preventing and responding to hazards within the refinery sector.

Federal Appeals Court Awards Damages to Pan Am Railways Employee

Pan Am Railways Inc. violated the Federal Railroad Safety Act after retaliating against a worker who tried to report an injury and later filed a complaint.

Because of this, a federal appeals court ruled that the North Billerica, Mass.-based company must pay $260,000 in punitive and compensatory damages to the employee.

4 Ways to Create a Positive Work Environment [Photo Gallery]

Workers in the United States spend more time in the office or on the job site than any other country, according to a 2015 Gallup poll.

An average of 47 hours per week per employees leads to an increase in productivity, but the Economic Policy Institute says that incomes have failed to rise as productivity grows, leading to wage inequality and potential burnout if the work environment becomes too stressful.

Sincerely Stefanie: Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches

During a brunch in April, I discussed safety with a close friend who happens to own his own business.

He built his company from the ground up, and in an effort to provide opportunities to those in need, he employs some workers who would not be able to gain employment elsewhere. With this comes a set of challenges. For the most part, his workers' experiences vastly are different from those who had a grounded upbringing and who didn't have to worry about their next meal.

Distracted Driving, Falls, Opioids Cause Spike in Unintentional Death Rate

The preventable death rate in the United States is increasing despite an overall improving fatality rate, according to the National Safety Council’s 2017 Injury Facts publication.

NSC’s latest Injury Fact report, which has been published annually for a century,  examines unintentional injury data from 2015 and analyzes the causes and factors that play a role in the 7.7 percent increase in deaths from 2014.

Cal/OSHA Cites Two Companies After Confined Space Death

On Oct. 21, 2016, a D&D Construction employee entered a drainage shaft to clean out mud and debris.

No personal fall protection was utilized as the worker descended via bucket 10 ft. into the shaft, which was 4.5 ft. in diameter and lined with concrete.

At some point, the worker lost consciousness due to the oxygen deficient atmosphere in the confined space and fell 40 ft., then drowned in a foot of water.

Manufacturing Future STEM Leaders

Manufacturing is undergoing another revolution. The first was powered by steam water and coal. The second: powered by electricity.

Today, we are in the midst of a technological revolution that is changing the proficiencies required for both skilled and unskilled labor to be successful.

Montana Coal Miner Dies After Truck Falls 100 Feet Into Pit

The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has launched an investigation into a Westmoreland Coal Company miner’s death.

On Saturday, May 6, Michael Ramsey, a 62-year-old worker from Colstrip, Mont., was operating a dump truck at Westmoreland’s Rosebud Mine when the 100-ton haul vehicle fell 100 feet into a pit, according to news reports.

MSHA: Five Miners Die in First Three Months of 2017
Working alone is a risk outlined in MSHA 30 CFR  56.18020. It states:
 
No employee shall be assigned, or allowed, or be required to perform work alone in any area where hazardous conditions exist that would endanger the employee's safety unless the employee can communicate with others, can be heard, or can be seen.
Share the Road: May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month
Summer fun is around the corner, and motorcycles already can be seen cruising in your local neighborhoods.
May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.
Poultry and Meat Processing Industries Rank High for Severe Injuries

Cargill, Tyson and Pilgrim’s Pride rank within the top 15 companies for severe injuries in the United States, according to the National Employment Law Project.

The nonprofit released a report which examined severe injury data compiled by OSHA since 2015. Severe injuries are defined as involving amputation, hospitalization or loss of an eye.

Airgas Surveillance Footage
CSB: Fatal Airgas Nitrous Oxide Explosion Was No Laughing Matter 2

On Aug. 28, 2016, an Airgas employee began the process of transferring nitrous oxide into a trailer. A pump being used in the operation heated the gas above its safe operating limit, triggering the nitrous oxide to rapidly decompose in the pump.

The reaction then moved from the pump into the trailer and caused an explosion which killed the Airgas operator, scattered large metal fragments for hundreds of feet.

The facility also was badly damaged, and Airgas had to stop production of nitrous oxide indefinitely.

Jeremy Bethancourt Named 2017 ASSE Safety Professional of the Year

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) has named  Jeremy Bethancourt, director of safety, health and training for LeBlanc Building Co. Inc. of Scottsdale, Ariz., as the organization’s 2017 Edgar Monsanto Queeny Safety Professional of the Year.

Besides holding the position of government affairs for ASSE’s Arizona chapter, Bethancourt has played  a lead role in getting billboards posted throughout Arizona to bring attention to the dangers of distracted driving.

Comments
Sincerely Stefanie: Upcoming M. Night Shyamalan Movie "Split" Vilifies Mental Illness
October 27, 2016

"Because it's a universal Human behavior, pointing out differences, especially extreme differences, makes for great story material. If someone can turn that material into a...

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